Anonymous browsing hinders online dating signals

Online DatingEven online, women tend to send ‘weak signals’ rather than making ‘first move’, study finds.

Big data and the growing popularity of online dating sites may be reshaping a fundamental human activity: finding a mate, or at least a date. Yet a new study in Management Science finds that certain longstanding social norms persist, even online.

In a large-scale experiment conducted through a major North American online dating website, a team of management scholars from Canada, the U.S. and Taiwan examined the impact of a premium feature: anonymous browsing. Out of 100,000 randomly selected new users, 50,000 were given free access to the feature for a month, enabling them to view profiles of other users without leaving telltale digital traces.

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How do young women view the relationship in Fifty Shades of Grey?

Fifty shades of misteryExamining women’s perceptions of the relationship between Christian and Anastasia in the popular movie Fifty Shades of Grey is a safe and valuable way to discuss healthy and unhealthy relationship dynamics, including the warning signs of intimate partner violence.

Young women expressed mixed views, describing parts of the movie relationship as exciting and romantic and other aspects as controlling, manipulative, and emotionally abusive in a new study published in Journal of Women’s Health, a peer-reviewed publication fromMary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available to download free on theJournal of Women’s Health website.

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Women and men react differently to infidelity

A recent Norwegian study shows that men and women react differently to various types of infidelity. Whereas men are most jealous of sexual infidelity, so-called emotional infidelity is what makes women the most jealous. Evolutionary psychology may help explain why this may be.

If relationships are good — positive, negative humor by leaders improves job satisfaction

Chris Robert and his team found that the relationship between leader-humor and job satisfaction is dependent on the quality of the relationship between leaders and their subordinates, not the positive or negative tone of the leader's humor. CREDIT Ashley Burden, Robert J. Trulaske, Sr. College of Business

Chris Robert and his team found that the relationship between leader-humor and job satisfaction is dependent on the quality of the relationship between leaders and their subordinates, not the positive or negative tone of the leader’s humor.
CREDIT: Ashley Burden, Robert J. Trulaske, Sr. College of Business

ast research as well as conventional wisdom about the use of humor by leaders suggests that positive humor should result in happier subordinates who are satisfied with their jobs. Conventional wisdom also suggests that leaders should avoid negative humor, though actual support for that belief is scarce and ambiguous. Now, a recent study from the University of Missouri has found that the relationship between leader-humor and job satisfaction is dependent on the quality of the relationship between leaders and their subordinates not the positive or negative tone of the leader’s humor.

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Did grandmas make people pair up?

Computer simulations link grandmothering and longevity to a surplus of older fertile men and, in turn, to the male tendency to guard a female mate from the competition and form a "pair bond" with her instead of mating with numerous partners.

Want a better relationship and a better sex life?

Father comforts a sad childIf men take up more of the child-care duties, splitting them equally with their female partners, heterosexual couples have more satisfaction with their relationships and their sex lives, according to new research by Georgia State University sociologists.

The research was presented Aug. 23 at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association.

Daniel L. Carlson, along with graduate students Sarah Hanson and Andrea Fitzroy used data from more than 900 heterosexual couples’ responses in the 2006 Marital Relationship Study (MARS).

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