Survey of 5,000 reveals people’s ‘happy habits’

Happiness is more than just a feeling; it is something we can all practise on a daily basis. But people are better at some ‘happy habits’ than others. In fact, the one habit that corresponds most closely with us being satisfied with our lives overall – self-acceptance – is often the one we practise least.

Can money buy happiness?: The relationship between money and well-being

Researchers are investigating new directions in the science of spending. Four presentations during the symposium “Happy Money 2.0: New Insights Into the Relationship Between Money and Well-Being,” delve into the effects of experiential purchases, potential negative impacts on abundance, the psychology of lending to friends, and how the wealthy think differently about well-being. The symposium takes place during the SPSP …

Don't worry, be (moderately) happy, research suggests

Could the pursuit of happiness go too far? Most self-help books on the subject offer tips on how to maximize one’s bliss, but a new study suggests that moderate happiness may be preferable to full-fledged elation. The researchers, from the University of Virginia, the University of Illinois and Michigan State University, looked at data from the World Values Survey, a …

A sniff of happiness: Chemicals in sweat may convey positive emotion

Humans may be able to communicate positive emotions like happiness through the smell of our sweat, according to new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The research indicates that we produce chemical compounds, or chemosignals, when we experience happiness that are detectable by others who smell our sweat.

Online discussion forums good for well-being, study shows

A new study has found that internet discussion forums have positive links to well-being and are even associated with increased community engagement offline, contrary to a common perception of them being outdated and prone to trolling.

One mood keeps coming through all human language

Movie subtitles in Arabic, Twitter feeds in Korean, the famously dark literature of Russia, websites in Chinese, music lyrics in English, and even the war-torn pages of the New York Times–the researchers found that these, and probably all human language¬, skews toward the use of happy words.