Slow down your typing to improve your writing: Study

Woman holding glass of water with appleThe quality of your writing will likely get better if you simply type slower, according to a recent study.

Researchers from the University of Waterloo asked study participants to type essays using both hands or with only one. Using text-analysis software, the team discovered that some aspects of essay writing, such as sophistication of vocabulary, improved when participants used only one hand to type.

“Typing can be too fluent or too fast, and can actually impair the writing process,” said Srdan Medimorec, a PhD candidate in the Faculty of Arts at Waterloo and lead author of the study. “It seems that what we write is a product of the interactions between our thoughts and the tools we use to express them.”

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Graying but grinning: Despite physical ailments, older adults happier

Dilip Jeste, M.D., Distinguished Professor of Psychiatry and Neurosciences and director of the Center on Healthy Aging at UC San Diego. CREDIT: UC San Diego Health

Dilip Jeste, M.D., Distinguished Professor of Psychiatry and Neurosciences and director of the Center on Healthy Aging at UC San Diego.
CREDIT: UC San Diego Health

While even the best wines eventually peak and turn to vinegar, a new study by researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine suggests a paradoxical trend in the mental health of aging adults: They seem to consistently get better over time.

“Their improved sense of psychological well-being was linear and substantial,” said senior author Dilip Jeste, MD, Distinguished Professor of Psychiatry and Neurosciences and director of the Center on Healthy Aging at UC San Diego. “Participants reported that they felt better about themselves and their lives year upon year, decade after decade.”

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For arts nonprofits, attendance at events unlikely to influence donors

Mirae Kim, assistant professor in the MU Truman School of Public Affairs, says that arts nonprofits that perform better according to philanthropic standards are not necessarily rewarded with more contributions from individual donors. CREDIT: MU News Bureau

Mirae Kim, assistant professor in the MU Truman School of Public Affairs, says that arts nonprofits that perform better according to philanthropic standards are not necessarily rewarded with more contributions from individual donors.
CREDIT: MU News Bureau

Arts and cultural nonprofit organizations promote arts appreciation and strengthen communities by providing a wide range of arts programs in music, theater, visual arts and dance. These organizations rely on donations to exist. One way that the nonprofit sector currently measures these organizations’ successes is by the number of people who attend their programs. However, new research from the University of Missouri finds no evidence to support the idea that donors are influenced by high attendance numbers; in fact, large audience numbers may actually lead to fewer donations.

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‘Deeply unsettling’ weight discrimination in the workplace highlighted

Woman workingWomen face weight-based prejudice in the workplace – even when their body mass index (BMI) is within the healthy range, research led by a University of Strathclyde academic has found.

In the study, participants were asked to rate people for their suitability for jobs in the service sector, based on their appearance. Researchers found even marginal increases in weight had a negative impact on female candidates’ job prospects.

Professor Dennis Nickson, who is based at the University’s Department of Human Resource Management, said: “Many organisations in the service sector, such as shops, bars and hotels, seek to employ people with the right ‘look’ which will fit with their corporate image.

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Do teachers’ climate change beliefs influence students?

2015 was the warmest year since modern record-keeping began in 1880, according to a new analysis by NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies. The record-breaking year continues a long-term warming trend -- 15 of the 16 warmest years on record have now occurred since 2001. CREDIT Credits: Scientific Visualization Studio/Goddard Space Flight Center

2015 was the warmest year since modern record-keeping began in 1880, according to a new analysis by NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies. The record-breaking year continues a long-term warming trend — 15 of the 16 warmest years on record have now occurred since 2001.
CREDIT: Credits: Scientific Visualization Studio/Goddard Space Flight Center

A North Carolina State University study of middle school science classes explored whether teachers’ beliefs about climate change influenced students’ perceptions.

“The answer is yes and no,” says Kathryn Stevenson, an assistant professor in NC State’s College of Natural Resources and lead author of a paper describing the study, published inPLOS ONE. “While students generally mirror a teacher’s belief that global warming is happening, when it comes to the cause of climate change, students reason for themselves and reach different conclusions than their teachers do.”

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