Grill with caution: Wire bristles from barbecue brushes can cause serious injuries

David Chang, M.D., associate professor of otolaryngology at the MU School of Medicine. CREDIT: MU Health

David Chang, M.D., associate professor of otolaryngology at the MU School of Medicine.
CREDIT: MU Health

While many people view Memorial Day weekend as the unofficial start of the summer grilling season, they may not be aware of the dangers of eating food cooked on grills cleaned with wire-bristle brushes. A new study conducted at the University of Missouri School of Medicine identified more than 1,600 injuries from wire-bristle grill brushes reported in emergency rooms since 2002.

Loose bristles can fall off the brush during cleaning and end up in the grilled food, which, if consumed, can lead to injuries in the mouth, throat and tonsils. Researchers advise individuals to inspect their food carefully after grilling or consider alternative grill-cleaning methods.

read more

New study suggests rethink of dementia causes

photodune-8331416-dementia-xs

University of Adelaide researchers have developed a new theory for the causes of dementia and other neurodegenerative diseases, involving an out-of-control immune system.

Published in the journal Frontiers in Neuroscience, the researchers have assembled strong evidence that the neurological decline common to these diseases is caused by ‘auto-inflammation’, where the body’s own immune system develops a persistent inflammatory response and causes brain cells to die.

“Dementia, including the most common form Alzheimer’s Disease, and related neurodegenerative conditions are dramatically rising in frequency as people live longer and our population ages,” says study lead Professor Robert Richards, from the University of Adelaide’s School of Biological Sciences. “Australia is predicting that by 2050 there will be almost double the number of people with dementia, and the United States similarly says there will be twice as many.

read more

Internet addiction and school burnout feed into each other

hispanic sweet little school girl crying suffering internet bullying abuseExcessive internet use contributes to the development of school burnout. School burnout, in turn, may lead to excessive internet use or digital addiction. Mind the Gap, a longitudinal research project funded by the Academy of Finland, has established a link between digital addiction and school burnout in both comprehensive school and upper secondary school students. The results of the Finnish study were published in May 2016 in the  Journal of Youth and Adolescence.

The findings show that via school burnout, adolescents’ excessive internet use can ultimately lead to depression. Exposure to digital addiction is most likely to happen if the adolescent loses interest in school and feels cynicism towards school.

read more

Immunization with bacteria promotes stress resilience, coping behaviors in mice

This is Mycobacterium vaccae. Photo by Christopher Lowry

This is Mycobacterium vaccae.
Photo by Christopher Lowry

Injections of the soil bacterium Mycobacterium vaccae promote stress resilience and improve coping behaviors in mice, according to a new study led by researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and University of Colorado Boulder. The researchers also found that M. vaccae prevented stress-induced colitis, a typical symptom of inflammatory bowel disease, suggesting that immunization with the bacteria may have wide-ranging health benefits.

The findings are published May 16 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

read more

High performance golf club comes with annoying sound

GolfIn 2007, a new type of golf club hit the market. The distribution of mass in the club head made it less likely to twist, making an off-center hit less likely to send the ball veering off course. It did have one drawback: a loud noise when it struck the ball, piercing through the tranquility of a golf course. The club never grew popular among players, with many saying they disliked the noise.

“Some players compared the sound to a cookie tray hitting the top of a car,” said Daniel Russell, a professor of acoustics at The Pennsylvania State University. “It was such a different — some say annoyingly loud — sound, it raised eyebrows.”

read more

Ketamine lifts depression via a byproduct of its metabolism

A team of NIH intramural scientists and grantees traced ketamine's rapid antidepressant effects to activation of AMPA receptors by a byproduct of its chemical breakdown called (2R,6R)-HNK - a different mechanism than had been previously assumed. CREDIT NIH - National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences

A team of NIH intramural scientists and grantees traced ketamine’s rapid antidepressant effects to activation of AMPA receptors by a byproduct of its chemical breakdown called (2R,6R)-HNK – a different mechanism than had been previously assumed.
CREDIT
NIH – National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences

A chemical byproduct, or metabolite, created as the body breaks down ketamine likely holds the secret to its rapid antidepressant action, National Institutes of Health (NIH) scientists and grantees have discovered. This metabolite singularly reversed depression-like behaviors in mice without triggering any of the anesthetic, dissociative, or addictive side effects associated with ketamine.

“This discovery fundamentally changes our understanding of how this rapid antidepressant mechanism works and holds promise for development of more robust and safer treatments,” said Carlos Zarate, M.D. of the NIH’s National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), a study co-author and a pioneer of research using ketamine to treat depression. “By using a team approach, researchers were able to reverse-engineer ketamine’s workings from the clinic to the lab to pinpoint what makes it so unique.”

read more

Nonprofit exec turnover more turbulent than previously thought

Stressed business womanNew research from North Carolina State University finds that turnover among executive leaders at nonprofit organizations is often plagued by problems – with very few transitional periods mirroring the scenarios painted in the professional literature. The study also found that most nonprofit executives do not leave their positions due to voluntary retirement, as previously thought.

“There has been very little empirical evaluation of executive turnover in nonprofits,” says Amanda Stewart, an assistant professor of public administration at NC State and author of a paper describing the work. “And, because executive turnover is inevitable, it’s important to pay attention to what organizations can do to limit any adverse impacts turnover can have on a nonprofit and its mission.”

read more

Body image strongly linked to overall life satisfaction

Healthy happy young man thumb up towel isolatedChapman University has just published the results of a national study on the factors linked to satisfaction with appearance and weight. In a survey of more than 12,000 Americans adults, the questions focused on personality, beliefs about romantic relationships, self-esteem, television viewing, and personal characteristics.

“Our study shows that men’s and women’s feelings about their weight and appearance play a major role in how satisfied they are with their lives overall,” said David Frederick, Ph.D., assistant professor of psychology at Chapman University and lead author on the study.

read more

Story links for Tony Delroy’s NightLife May 13

Digital media may be changing how you think

photodune-9918314-using-tablet-xs (1)

The research tested the basic question: would processing the same information on a digital versus non-digital platform affect “construal levels”– the fundamental level of concreteness versus abstractness that people use in perceiving and interpreting behaviors, events and other informational stimuli. In order to study the basic question of whether processing the same information on one platform or the other would trigger a different baseline “interpretive lens” or mindset that would influence construals of information, the research tried to hold as many factors as possible constant between the digital and non-digital platforms. Reading material and other content for the study for example, was published using the same print size and format in both the digital and non-digital (print) versions. The research was comprised of four studies that evaluated how information processing is affected by each platform. A total of more than 300 participants, ages 20 to 24 years old, took part in the studies, which were comprised of 60 to 100+ participants.

read more