Mormon + Mormon = Higher home price

This is Timothy Gubler, an assistant professor of management. CREDIT: UC Riverside

This is Timothy Gubler, an assistant professor of management. CREDIT: UC Riverside

A unique study that combined real estate transaction data and Mormon congregation boundaries in Utah found home sellers made an average of about $4,000 more when they used a real estate agent from the same church congregation.

The study, by Timothy Gubler, an assistant professor of management at the University of California, Riverside’s School of Business Administration, also found the $4,000 increase occurred without significantly increasing the amount of time the home was on the market, or decreasing its probability of sale.

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Why hasn’t he/she replied yet?

What are the chances that a person will respond to your email in the next hour? And why is the reply so terse? New study finds that email responses depend on a variety of factors including age, platform, volume and timing.

Why hasn't he/she replied yet?

What are the chances that a person will respond to your email in the next hour? And why is the reply so terse? New study finds that email responses depend on a variety of factors including age, platform, volume and timing.

Researchers discover clues on how giraffe neck evolved

A new study of fossil cervical vertebrae reveals the evolution likely occurred in several stages as one of the animal's neck vertebrae stretched first toward the head and then toward the tail a few million years later.

The science of retweets

An algorithm that takes into account the past activity of each of your followers -- and makes predictions about future tweeting -- can lead to more "retweets" than other commonly used methods, such as posting at peak traffic times.

If relationships are good — positive, negative humor by leaders improves job satisfaction

Chris Robert and his team found that the relationship between leader-humor and job satisfaction is dependent on the quality of the relationship between leaders and their subordinates, not the positive or negative tone of the leader's humor. CREDIT Ashley Burden, Robert J. Trulaske, Sr. College of Business

Chris Robert and his team found that the relationship between leader-humor and job satisfaction is dependent on the quality of the relationship between leaders and their subordinates, not the positive or negative tone of the leader’s humor.
CREDIT: Ashley Burden, Robert J. Trulaske, Sr. College of Business

ast research as well as conventional wisdom about the use of humor by leaders suggests that positive humor should result in happier subordinates who are satisfied with their jobs. Conventional wisdom also suggests that leaders should avoid negative humor, though actual support for that belief is scarce and ambiguous. Now, a recent study from the University of Missouri has found that the relationship between leader-humor and job satisfaction is dependent on the quality of the relationship between leaders and their subordinates not the positive or negative tone of the leader’s humor.

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