Breaking the anxiety cycle

A woman who won’t drive long distances because she has panic attacks in the car. A man who has contamination fears so intense he cannot bring himself to use public bathrooms. A woman who can’t go to church because she fears enclosed spaces. All of these people have two things in common: they have an anxiety disorder. They’re also parents.

Each of these parents sought help because they struggle with anxiety, and want to prevent their children from suffering the same way. Children of anxious parents are at increased risk for developing the disorder. Yet that does not need to be the case, according to new research by UConn Health psychiatrist Golda Ginsburg.

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Women and men react differently to infidelity

A recent Norwegian study shows that men and women react differently to various types of infidelity. Whereas men are most jealous of sexual infidelity, so-called emotional infidelity is what makes women the most jealous. Evolutionary psychology may help explain why this may be.

Antidepressants plus blood-thinners slow down brain cancer

Gliomas are aggressive brain tumors arising from the brain’s supporting glial cells. They account for about a third of all brain tumors, and hold the highest incidence and mortality rate among primary brain cancer patients, creating an urgent need for effective treatments. Certain antidepressants already in the market could lower the risk of gliomas, but there has been little evidence to support their use in patients. Now, scientists at EPFL have discovered that tricyclic antidepressants combined with anticoagulant drugs can actually slow down gliomas by causing the cancer cells to eat themselves. The study is published in Cancer Cell.

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Cellphones can damage romantic relationships, lead to depression

 Research from Baylor University’s Hankamer School of Business confirms that cellphones are damaging romantic relationships and leading to higher levels of depression.

James A. Roberts, Ph.D., The Ben H. Williams Professor of Marketing, and Meredith David, Ph.D., assistant professor of marketing, published their study – “My life has become a major distraction from my cell phone: Partner phubbing and relationship satisfaction among romantic partners” – in the journal Computers in Human Behavior.

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Reduce stress – wash those dishes (mindfully).

A woman washes a plate using soapy water, a sponge and protective workwear.

 Washing those dreadful dishes after a long day seems like the furthest thing from relaxation. Or is it? Student and faculty researchers at Florida State University have found that mindfully washing dishes calms the mind and decreases stress.

Published in the journal Mindfulness,the study looked at whether washing dishes could be used as an informal contemplative practice that promotes a positive state of mindfulness — a meditative method of focusing attention on the emotions and thoughts of the present moment.

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Background positive music increases people’s willingness to do others harm

We're all familiar with the use of music as a tool of persuasion in advertising, writes Dr Christian Jarrett in Research Digest for the British Psychological Society.. A new study published in the Psychology of Music takes this further by testing whether positive music increases people's willingness to do bad things to others.

Background positive music increases people's willingness to do others harm

We're all familiar with the use of music as a tool of persuasion in advertising, writes Dr Christian Jarrett in Research Digest for the British Psychological Society.. A new study published in the Psychology of Music takes this further by testing whether positive music increases people's willingness to do bad things to others.