Memory-loss man case 'like nothing we have ever seen before'

  • University of Leicester psychologist describes unique case as new to science
  • 38-year-old fit and healthy man suffered memory loss after local anaesthetic and root-canal treatment at dentist
  • For the past decade he can only remember up to 90 minutes
  • And he awakes each day thinking it is the same day he went to the dentist
  • Symptoms are akin to those depicted in movies such as Groundhog Day and Memento
  • There is no evidence that the treatment at the dentist can be blamed for his condition

“One of our reasons for writing up this individual’s case was that we had never seen anything like this before in our assessment clinics, and we do not know what to make of it. We had never seen anything like it before.” – Lecturer in Clinical Psychology, Dr Gerald Burgess, University of Leicester

A University of Leicester clinical psychologist has described treating an individual with a ‘Groundhog Day/Memento’- style memory loss as ‘like nothing we have ever seen before’.

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Study identifies factors affecting prescription pain reliever misuse

Researchers at the UGA School of Social Work found that adults aged 50 and above were more likely to acquire prescription pain relievers through multiple doctors, whereas younger individuals were more likely to acquire them from friends, relatives, or drug dealers. Regardless of age, all those who misused prescription painkillers had a history of recent use of illicit drugs. CREDIT UGA

Researchers at the UGA School of Social Work found that adults aged 50 and above were more likely to acquire prescription pain relievers through multiple doctors, whereas younger individuals were more likely to acquire them from friends, relatives, or drug dealers. Regardless of age, all those who misused prescription painkillers had a history of recent use of illicit drugs.
CREDIT
UGA

People who misuse prescription pain relievers all have one thing in common, University of Georgia researchers have discovered: a history of recent illicit drug use. How they acquire such drugs varies according to age, however. The findings, published in the journal Addictive Behaviors, may help health care providers and others curb painkiller misuse.

In a nationwide study, researchers from the UGA School of Social Work found that individuals of any age who used illicit drugs such as marijuana, cocaine or heroin within the past year had a higher likelihood of misusing prescription pain relievers as well. A study just released by the Centers for Disease Control, which found that heroin use was highest among those who abused cocaine or opioid pain relievers within the past year, buttressed the UGA research.

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Men may feel more threatened by female bosses, research finds

big womanMen may feel threatened by female supervisors and act more assertively toward them than male bosses, which could disrupt the workplace with struggles over power dynamics, according to new research published by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology.

“The concept of masculinity is becoming more elusive in society as gender roles blur, with more women taking management positions and becoming the major breadwinners for their families,” said lead researcher Ekaterina Netchaeva, an assistant professor of management and technology at Bocconi University in Milan, Italy. “Even men who support gender equality may see these advances as a threat to their masculinity, whether they consciously acknowledge it or not.”

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Intellectual pursuits may buffer the brain against addiction

New study of mice finds that intellectual pursuits can make us more resistant to the lure of drugs. CREDIT Photo illustration by Emily Strange

New study of mice finds that intellectual pursuits can make us more resistant to the lure of drugs.
CREDIT
Photo illustration by Emily Strange

Challenging the idea that addiction is hardwired in the brain, a new UC Berkeley study of mice suggests that even a short time spent in a stimulating learning environment can rewire the brain’s reward system and buffer it against drug dependence.

Scientists tracked cocaine cravings in more than 70 adult male mice and found that those rodents whose daily drill included exploration, learning and finding hidden tasty morsels were less likely than their enrichment-deprived counterparts to seek solace in a chamber where they had been given cocaine.

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New recommendations addresses the diagnosis and management of testosterone deficiency

An expert panel convened by the International Society for Sexual Medicine has developed a detailed “Process of Care” for the diagnosis and management of testosterone deficiency in men.

After an extensive literature review and in-depth consultations, the panel of 18 experts from a wide range of medical disciplines recommended that testosterone deficiency be defined as a clinical and biochemical syndrome characterized by both a deficiency of testosterone or testosterone action, and relevant symptoms. The panel stressed that the condition may affect multiple organ systems as well as sexual function. They also noted that the prevalence of symptomatic testosterone deficiency in men is within the range of 2% to 6%, and it is often associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes, but not necessarily with aging.

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3-D printers poised to have major implications for food manufacturing

The use of 3D printers has the potential to revolutionize the way food is manufactured within the next 10 to 20 years, impacting everything from how military personnel get food on the battlefield to how long it takes to get a meal from the computer to your table, according to a July 12th symposium at IFT15: Where Science Feeds Innovation hosted by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) in Chicago.

The price of 3D printers has been steadily declining, from more than $500,000 in the 1980s to less than $1,000 today for a personal-sized device, making them increasingly available to consumers and manufacturers Although they are not widely used in food manufacturing yet, that availability is fueling research into how they can be used to customize foods or speed delivery of food to consumers.

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Scientists find molecular switch that creates long-term immunity

Melbourne researchers have identified a protein responsible for preserving the antibody-producing cells that lead to long-term immunity after infection or vaccination.

Dr Kim Good-Jacobson, Professor David Tarlinton and colleagues from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute discovered the presence of a protein called Myb was essential for antibody-producing plasma cells to migrate into bone marrow, preserving them for many years or even decades. Their findings were published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine.

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