Discovery paves way for homebrewed drugs

Bioengineers at the University of California, Berkeley, has completed key steps needed to turn sugar-fed yeast into a microbial factory for producing morphine and potentially other drugs, including antibiotics and anti-cancer therapeutics.>

The cost of dominance

Bad news for relentless power-seekers the likes of Frank Underwood on House of Cards: Climbing the ladder of social status through aggressive, competitive striving might shorten your life as a result of increased vulnerability to cardiovascular disease. And good news for successful types who are friendlier: Attaining higher social status as the result of prestige and freely given respect may have protective effects, the researchers found.

Study reveals sexual appeal of war heroes

Women are more attracted to war heroes than regular soldiers or men who display heroic traits in other fields, such as in sports or natural disaster work, according to new research.. The findings also suggest that men did not find heroism to be a sexually attractive trait in women.

Nearly 1 in 10 Adults Has Impulsive Anger Issues and Access To Guns

An estimated 9 percent of adults in the U.S. have a history of impulsive, angry behavior and have access to guns, according to a study published this month in Behavioral Sciences and the Law. The study also found that an estimated 1.5 percent of adults report impulsive anger and carry firearms outside their homes.

Just slip out the back, Jack

A research review article by Brian Boutwell, Ph.D., associate professor of criminology and criminal justice and epidemiology at Saint Louis University, finds humans are hard wired to break romantic relationships and form new ones. CREDIT Photo by Maria Tsikalas

A research review article by Brian Boutwell, Ph.D., associate professor of criminology and criminal justice and epidemiology at Saint Louis University, finds humans are hard wired to break romantic relationships and form new ones.
CREDIT
Photo by Maria Tsikalas

A Saint Louis University research review article suggests people are hardwired to fall out of love and move onto new romantic relationships.

“Our review of the literature suggests we have a mechanism in our brains designed by natural selection to pull us through a very tumultuous time in our lives,” said Brian Boutwell, Ph.D., associate professor of criminology and criminal justice and associate professor of epidemiology at Saint Louis University. “It suggests people will recover; the pain will go away with time. There will be a light at the end of the tunnel.”

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Genes predispose some people to focus on the negative

A new study by a University of British Columbia researcher finds that some people are genetically predisposed to see the world darkly. The study, published in Psychological Science, finds that a previously known gene variant can cause individuals to perceive emotional events--especially negative ones - more vividly than others.