Mothers' 'baby talk' is less clear than their adult speech

People tend to have a distinctive way of talking to babies and small children: We speak more slowly, using a sing-song voice, and tend to use cutesy words like "tummy". While we might be inclined to think that "baby talk" is easier for children to understand, new research findings in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, suggest that mothers may actually speak less clearly to their infants than they do to adults.

Expressing anger linked with better health in some cultures

AngerIn the US and many Western countries, people are urged to manage feelings of anger or suffer its ill effects — but new research with participants from the US and Japan suggests that anger may actually be linked with better, not worse, health in certain cultures.

The findings are published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

“Many of us in Western societies naively believe that anger is bad for health, and beliefs like these appear to be bolstered by recent scientific findings,” says psychological scientist Shinobu Kitayama of the University of Michigan. “But our study suggests that the truism linking anger to ill health may be valid only within the cultural boundary of the ‘West,’ where anger functions as an index of frustration, poverty, low status and everything else that potentially compromises health.”

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