Should we make a film that audiences enjoy or nab an Oscar nomination?

Gabriel Rossman and Oliver Schilke analyzed 25 years worth of data on mainstream cinema and discovered that makers of films that are likely to appeal to the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences face the same risk-and-reward structure as lobbyists who contribute to political candidates in the hopes of getting favorable treatment when laws are written or pork doled out.

Heavy drinking in middle age may speed memory loss by up to 6 years in men

Middle-aged men who drink more than 36 grams of alcohol, or two and a half US drinks per day, may speed their memory loss by up to six years later on, according to a study published in the January 15, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Self-control isn’t in short supply (despite what it looks like)

"The main contribution of the paper is to say that although self-control is harder for people in these moments of fatigue; it's not that people cannot control themselves, it's that they don't feel like controlling themselves, at least on certain tasks," said Michael Inzlicht.

UK rates of gout soaring, but treatment remains poor

UK rates of gout have soared since the late 1990s, with one in every 40 people now affected by the condition – the highest in Europe – but treatment remains as poor now as it was then, reveals research published online in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases.

But there is wide variation in both the prevalence (existing cases) and incidence (new cases) of gout across the UK, with the highest numbers of cases in Wales and the North East of England, the data show.

The researchers used the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) to estimate both the prevalence and incidence of gout in the UK between 1997 and 2012.

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Mindfulness Helps Undergraduates

Mindfulness training, specifically designed for undergraduate students, shows promise as a tool to train attention and improve learning during the academic semester

3 risk factors most highly correlated with child obesity

A University of Illinois study has identified the three most significant risk factors for child obesity among preschoolers: (1) inadequate sleep, (2) a parental BMI that classifies the mom or dad as overweight or obese, and (3) parental restriction of a child's eating in order to control his weight.

Natural selection can favor ‘irrational’ behavior

It seems paradoxical that a preference for which of two houses to buy could depend on another, inferior, house – but researchers at the University of Bristol have identified that seemingly irrelevant alternatives can, and should, influence choices.