Detecting Sickness By Smell

Humans are able to smell sickness in someone whose immune system is highly active within just a few hours of exposure to a toxin

Night time smartphone means you’re not as smart the next day

In a pair of studies surveying a broad spectrum of U.S. workers, Russell Johnson and colleagues found that people who monitored their smart phones for business purposes after 9 p.m. were more tired and were less engaged the following day on the job.

Fast eye movements: A possible indicator of more impulsive decision-making

People who are less patient tend to move their eyes with greater speed. The findings, the researchers say, suggest that the weight people give to the passage of time may be a trait consistently used throughout their brains, affecting the speed with which they make movements, as well as the way they make certain decisions.

Training your brain using neurofeedback

A new brain-imaging technique enables people to ‘watch’ their own brain activity in real time and to control or adjust function in pre-determined brain regions.

Cocaine users enjoy social interactions less

Cocaine users perceived joined attention – the shared attentional focus of two persons on an object after gaze contact – as less rewarding compared to drug-naive healthy controls.